Tag: pig

Where Does It Hurt?

My final paper/project for my Writing as Art class last semester… I was going to make some edits before sharing it, but I decided to post it the way it was submitted first. I’m very attached to this work and will continue to develop it over the next few months. Creating this project was both challenging and incredibly rewarding. The thought of sharing it publicly gives me a lot of anxiety, but I am interested to see how others receive it. Please feel free to leave comments! xoxo

Download the PDF version

WDIH? Cover WDIH? 1-2

 

 

 

WDIH 3-4

 

 

WDIH? 5-6

 

 

WDIH? 7-8

 

 

WDIH? 9-10

 

 

WDIH? 11-12

 

 

WDIH? 13-14

 

 

WDIH? 15-16

 

 

WDIH? 17-18

 

 

WDIH? 19-20

 

 

WDIH? 21-22

 

WDIH? Bibliography

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Peeks at the Process of Yes II

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For the past few weeks I’ve been working on this painting in conjunction with a collection of writing for a grad school project. I am planning to share the project before the end of May, but for now here are some peeks at the process:

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Check back soon for more updates! xoxo

 

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Fall Semester Work

Untitled (Oil and Water)

Last semester was intense. Along with working a couple part-time jobs and working on side projects, I took my first online MFA class and attempted to maintain a regular studio practice for school. Read more

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Pig

Insulin, the precious liquid that keeps me and millions of other diabetics alive, was actually discovered pretty recently. Prior to insulin, when someone developed diabetes, it was fatal. In the 1920s, Frederick Banting and Charles Best were able to extract fluid from the pancreas of slaughtered cows and they learned that it could be used to manage diabetes. Animal insulin, mostly from cows and pigs, was the only treatment for insulin-dependent diabetes until the 1980s, when a synthetic insulin (human insulin) was created. Today, most diabetics use the synthetic insulin, but animal insulin is still available.

I was pretty young when someone told me that my insulin came from pigs. I wasn’t happy about it. I was diagnosed in 1994, well after synthetic insulin was invented, so it’s very possible that I’ve never injected myself with animal insulin. Nonetheless, it’s a theme I began to explore this past summer and I plan to do more work about it in the future.

Life or Death

Life or Death
Ink + Acrylic
9″ x 12″

Mutant

Mutant
Mixed Media
9″ x 12″

Pig Detail

 

 

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Yes.

While I was in Chicago, I was a little overwhelmed by the amount of feedback I received and consequently the number of ideas I had for my work. I wasn’t sure which path to go down and which method best suited my goals. This is how I was feeling when I had a studio visit with Gregg Bordowitz, the program director. I discussed my struggles with him, as well as my goals. He gave me tons of great advice, including one piece that became a major turning point for me.

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About a week or two earlier, I had gone to a fabric shop and picked up this piece of bright red-orange polyester material from a clearance bin. I wasn’t sure what I would do with it, I was just drawn to the color. I hung it up in my studio like this for a while and didn’t touch it. During my meeting with Gregg, we looked at the material as we discussed creating a “yes” wall. His instructions were as follows: 1) For 3 or 4 days, say “yes” to everything. 2) The next day, say “no.” Cover things up and make conscious decisions about what you want to include. I was really excited to try it out and decided to use the red-orange material since it was already something I’ve never used before.

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I had a lot of fun at first. I drew a large figure without worrying about proportions. I didn’t plan, I just painted. The fabric absorbed the paint quickly so I had to change the way I usually paint. The process was quick and pretty crude. I was happy with the piece so far and didn’t really want to add anything else, but it was my “yes” wall, so I forced myself to do more.

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I added more things and started to like it less and feel stuck. I started becoming concerned with the composition and I thought that I had already put too many colors so I stepped away from it for a few days and worked on other things. I guess at this point I wasn’t following the directions anymore.

When I did come back to it, I was in the zone. I used different materials and added text, numbers, shapes, images, and texture. By the time I “finished”, it had become my favorite piece from the whole summer. I’m really proud of it.

Yes.

Here is a list of the materials I used: acrylic paint (liquid, heavy bodied, and soft bodied), ink, oil pastel, oil stick, clear plastic, liquid watercolor, diabetic socks, medical tape, and thumbtacks.

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I’m not sure what’s going to happen with this piece. Right now it’s folded up in a bag until I find somewhere to hang it up. I might add more to it, but it’s more likely that I’ll make a new one using a similar process.

Thanks for reading!

 

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