Tag: taubman museum of art

Spring Inspiration (March – May)

This spring, I was largely inspired by talks and pieces of writing, maybe because I was fully immersed in my own studio work and I was mostly seeking written and verbal guidance:

“We can never have peace if we cannot understand the pain in each other’s hearts. The more we interact, the more we will come to realize that our humanity transcends all differences.”

1. Article: An Open Letter to the Next Generation of Artists by Wayne Shorter + Herbie Hancock

“L’Engle weathered 26 rejections before Farrar, Straus & Giroux finally took a chance on A Wrinkle in Time. Many publishers were nervous about acquiring the novel because it was too difficult to categorize. Was it written for children or adults? Was the genre science fiction or fantasy? “

2. Article: “12 Fantastic Facts About A Wrinkle in Time” by Ali Parr

“Permit yourself to flow and overflow, allow for the rise in temperature, all the expansions and intensifications. Something is always born of excess: great art was born of great terrors, great loneliness, great inhibitions, instabilities, and it always balances them.”

3. Article: Why Emotional Excess is Essential to Writing and Creativity by Maria Popova (selected quote from The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. 4: 1944-1947)

“Where did I get the idea that being stoic and silent was the best way to be a strong young woman? Modern medicine suggests that we amputate, shut up, or extract what we’ve identified as the problem. That we must “overcome” or “defeat” our illnesses and our wounds. Take a pill, cut it out, burn it off, etc. But what if our symptoms have something to tell us? What if every articulation of our bodies, minds and spirits, pleasurable or painful, light or dark, were a message spoken in a perfect language? In this time when we have so many unanswered questions, the danger is not that our symptoms speak, the danger is not listening to what they have to say.”

4. Article: “Your Body is Attacking Itself”: How Language Can Get in the Way of Healing by Jesse

5. Work by Christoph Niemann

6. Amanda McCavour and her work (McCavour currently has an exhibition of her work at the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke, VA (Eye of the Needle) and she was generous enough to do an experimental drawing workshop with us this past spring.)

7. Work by Suzanna Fields

“But practiced at its highest level, mise-en-place says that time is precious. Resources are precious. Space is precious. Your self-respect and the respect of others are precious. Use them wisely. Isn’t that a philosophy for our time?”

8. Article: For a More Ordered Life, Organize Like a Chef by Dan Charnas

9. Holly Exley and her work

10. Tumblr Account: Dear Art Director

11. Article: The Illustrated Correspondence of Artists by Allison Meier

12. Podcast: TED Radio Hour

13. Fran Meneses and her work

14. Album: Good Grief by Lucius

Links: 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14

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Monster Art Rally 2016

Monster Art Rally Logo

Last year I participated in the 1st annual Monster Art Rally at the Taubman Museum of Art and I’m happy to announce that I’m participating again this year! The event is taking place this Thursday April 21st from 5-9pm. Over 30 local artists will be drawing on-site while visitors watch and learn about the artists, their work, and the art of buying art. All artwork will be on sale for $50 and each piece will go to the person who draws the highest card. Proceeds from art sales help support educational programming at the museum.

Food and drinks will be available for purchase, plus all galleries will be open until 9pm, including the Norman Rockwell exhibition. See below for more details and click here to visit the Facebook event.

MAR 2016 Flyer

If you are a local business, you can contribute by purchasing “Monster Dollars”–pre-paid sponsorships that can be used to play in the auction. Click here for more info and here to purchase.

Hope to see you there!! xoxo

Need Monster Art

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Monster Art Rally

Sweet MI

Sweet MI
Mixed Media (watercolor, ink, acrylic)
11″ x 14″

Museums and galleries across the country are participating in the Monster Drawing Rally, a live drawing event which was introduced by Southern Exposure in San Francisco. This year, The Taubman Museum of Art decided to join in and add a twist by allowing painting as well. Money from sales went towards educational programming at the museum. I was able to participate and it was exciting, inspiring, and admittedly a tad stressful. I rarely create work while people are watching me (unless I’m in a class or workshop) so it was a unique experience interacting with my audience while I created. I didn’t get to do everything I planned to do with my drawing because I ran out of time, but I was very happy with the final piece.

Version 3

I started my piece at home and finished it on site. It was sold almost immediately, and before I knew it, it was gone. That was something else I hadn’t experienced before. I usually get to live with my work for a little while (or a long while) before someone else takes it. It was a fun challenge to create for one hour and be forced to part with my creation so quickly!

My favorite part of the night was watching artists at work:

Photo Credit: Taubman Museum of Art
Photo Credit: Taubman Museum of Art

Photo Credit: Taubman Museum of Art
Photo Credit: Taubman Museum of Art

Aside from participating in the live event, I also got to design the logo that was used on various materials including coloring sheets for the kids.

MAR logo 2015

MAR Thank You Version 2

Overall I had an amazing time at the Monster Art Rally. I plan to participate again next year and I think I will switch it up and create the full piece on site. We’ll see… Anyway, thanks for reading! xoxo

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John Paul Caponigro Lecture

Recently at the Taubman Museum of Art here in Roanoke, we had an exhibition featuring the work of father and son photographers Paul Caponigro and John Paul Caponigro. I taught several art lessons inspired by their work and came to really love the photographs.

Right before the show was deinstalled, John Paul came to do a lecture on his creative process and I was fortunately able to attend. He is a wonderful speaker and so positive and encouraging. Something that especially resonated with me were his thoughts on planning and–ready for it?–attention. I mentioned earlier this week that I would bring this up again. The theme for my first summer residency in Chicago was Attention and since then I hear about it everywhere and all the time!

From the SAIC website…

Screen Shot 2015-04-07 at 5.00.10 PM

John Paul brought up the theme of planning and noticing as he talked about the way he works. Basically, once he knows what he’s looking for (he used waves as an example), he notices them everywhere: waves in the sand, waves in the water, waves in the sky. When you pay attention you notice patterns.
jpc notes

 

John Paul also signed some copies of this book, which showcases his work and his father’s work. Had to get one!

DSC_0488 DSC_0489

I can’t stress enough how valuable it is to hear an artist talk about their work and their practice. Take the time to listen and I can almost guarantee that you’ll appreciate the work more afterwards. As always, thanks for reading! xoxo

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Work News

Photo Credit: Randall Stout Architects
Photo Credit: Randall Stout Architects

If you’ve visited my blog before, you might know about my life as a post-graduate struggling to find a good job in my field. I wrote lots of cover letters and sent out lots of resumes in the past 16 months and needless to say, it was a pretty frustrating time. I knew that I would find something eventually, but it’s always hard to hear a “no” (or several “no’s” in a row).

I feel like I’m finally at a really good place. I am a graduate student so I needed something that wasn’t too intense. Last week I starting working at the Taubman Museum of Art here in Roanoke, VA and I love it. It’s an awesome balance of art and education and I feel so lucky to have landed this position. (Disclaimer: The postings of this site are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Taubman Museum of Art.) My official title is “Children’s Education Associate” so I’ll be working with kids in a museum setting. I probably won’t write too much about it, just for confidentiality reasons, but I wanted to share this news that’s very exciting for me :]

This year, I will also be teaching after school gifted art again, this time at two elementary schools. I expect my new role at the museum to give me lots and lots of lesson ideas that I can also use with my gifted art students.

I’m still figuring out some kind of routine so that I can effectively balance school, work, and studio time. It will be a challenge for sure, but I’m excited about it. In one of my online classes, we have actually been discussing post-Fordism workers and how they often juggle multiple roles and what it’s like to be an artist in this post-Fordist circumstance. This talk about post-Fordism (which is a recently learned term for me) truly resonates right now. Anyway, thanks for reading!

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