Tag: oil pastel

New Work: Medical Avatar Series

medical avatar

From left to right: In the Works, In Repair, In Control
18″ x 24″
Mixed Media
October 26-27, 2014

I finally finished my submissions for the Medical Avatar exhibition that’s coming up. Despite my busy schedule, I decided to enter this show because the theme is relevant to the work that I’m currently doing. I had even planned on doing more self-portraits this semester.

The prompt was this: Entries should include three self-portraits: you as you are today; you as you will be in 5 years if you continue with an unhealthy habit you have today; and you as you will be in 5 years if you continue with a healthy habit you have today.

This process was pretty frustrating and I wasn’t surprised that it turned out that way. Self-portraits are hard for me to get through. It was an interesting experience, making three self-portraits in different styles and with different messages. I’ll post more background information later on.

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Thanks for visiting :]

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More Summer Pieces

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Tender
9″ x 12″
Ink + Oil pastel on brown craft paper

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Untitled (Shape)
11″ x 14″
Watercolor + Gouache on watercolor paper

Subtle Cry

Subtle Cry
9″ x 12″
Acrylic + Oil stick on brown craft paper

Nope

Nope
11″ x 14″
Watercolor + Oil stick + Oil pastel on watercolor paper

Community

Community
9″ x 12″
Ink on brown craft paper

Untitled (Scrambled 2)

Untitled (Scrambled 2)
11″ x 14″
Acrylic on canvas paper

(Untitled) Shape 2

Untitled (Shape 2)
11″ x 14″
Acrylic + Oil pastel on canvas paper

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Various New Works

As a grad student, one of my goals is to make a lot of work and flesh out a lot of ideas. I got a good start during my first summer residency in Chicago. Here are several of the small paintings and drawings I created:

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)
8″ x 8″
Watercolor

Untitled (Anonymous)

Untitled (Anonymous)
8″ x 8″
Ink + acrylic

Untitled (Pink Grid)

Untitled (Pink Grid)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

Untitled (R/N)

Untitled (R/N)
6″ x 6″
Ink + gouache + tape

Untitled (Other Grid)

Untitled (Data)
6″ x 6″
Blood

Untitled (Conversation)

Untitled (Conversation)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink

Untitled (Deal With It)

Untitled (Deal With It)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink + acrylic

Untitled (Scrambled)

Untitled (Scrambled)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + oil pastel

Untitled (Ketones)
Untitled (Ketones)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

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New Work: Self-Destruct

Self-Destruct

Self-Destruct
Mixed Media (medicine, watercolor, acrylic, ink, oil pastel)
20″ x 28″

Self-Destruct (process 1) Self-Destruct (process 2)

Inspired by this quote from Jill Mormon in response to my question, “What is the hardest part about living with diabetes?”:

“Feeling like my body and the system designed to help me care for it are ALWAYS working against me and my health.”

Self-Destruct (detail 1)

Self-Destruct (detail 2)

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Yes.

While I was in Chicago, I was a little overwhelmed by the amount of feedback I received and consequently the number of ideas I had for my work. I wasn’t sure which path to go down and which method best suited my goals. This is how I was feeling when I had a studio visit with Gregg Bordowitz, the program director. I discussed my struggles with him, as well as my goals. He gave me tons of great advice, including one piece that became a major turning point for me.

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About a week or two earlier, I had gone to a fabric shop and picked up this piece of bright red-orange polyester material from a clearance bin. I wasn’t sure what I would do with it, I was just drawn to the color. I hung it up in my studio like this for a while and didn’t touch it. During my meeting with Gregg, we looked at the material as we discussed creating a “yes” wall. His instructions were as follows: 1) For 3 or 4 days, say “yes” to everything. 2) The next day, say “no.” Cover things up and make conscious decisions about what you want to include. I was really excited to try it out and decided to use the red-orange material since it was already something I’ve never used before.

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I had a lot of fun at first. I drew a large figure without worrying about proportions. I didn’t plan, I just painted. The fabric absorbed the paint quickly so I had to change the way I usually paint. The process was quick and pretty crude. I was happy with the piece so far and didn’t really want to add anything else, but it was my “yes” wall, so I forced myself to do more.

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I added more things and started to like it less and feel stuck. I started becoming concerned with the composition and I thought that I had already put too many colors so I stepped away from it for a few days and worked on other things. I guess at this point I wasn’t following the directions anymore.

When I did come back to it, I was in the zone. I used different materials and added text, numbers, shapes, images, and texture. By the time I “finished”, it had become my favorite piece from the whole summer. I’m really proud of it.

Yes.

Here is a list of the materials I used: acrylic paint (liquid, heavy bodied, and soft bodied), ink, oil pastel, oil stick, clear plastic, liquid watercolor, diabetic socks, medical tape, and thumbtacks.

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I’m not sure what’s going to happen with this piece. Right now it’s folded up in a bag until I find somewhere to hang it up. I might add more to it, but it’s more likely that I’ll make a new one using a similar process.

Thanks for reading!

 

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From the Vault: Oil Stick Portraits

 

 

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I was cleaning my studio area the other day and I stumbled across some drawings that I had completely forgotten about. I did them a few years ago when I first discovered and fell in love with oil sticks (the big ones). They lie somewhere between oil pastels and oil paint and they’re a lot of fun to use. Anyway, I was just playing around with them when I drew these quick made up portraits of somewhat creepy-looking girls with pale skin, black hair and bright red lips. I only had black, white, and cream oil sticks because they’re kind of pricey. I used regular oil pastels to add some color.

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Thanks for reading!

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