Tag: medicine

Fall 2015: Work

The past semester was a bit overwhelming–hence the lack of activity on here–but I’m so excited about the work I’m making. Here are some photos of the things I’ve been working on for the past few months. Next up: thesis!

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Where Does It Hurt?

My final paper/project for my Writing as Art class last semester… I was going to make some edits before sharing it, but I decided to post it the way it was submitted first. I’m very attached to this work and will continue to develop it over the next few months. Creating this project was both challenging and incredibly rewarding. The thought of sharing it publicly gives me a lot of anxiety, but I am interested to see how others receive it. Please feel free to leave comments! xoxo

Download the PDF version

WDIH? Cover WDIH? 1-2

 

 

 

WDIH 3-4

 

 

WDIH? 5-6

 

 

WDIH? 7-8

 

 

WDIH? 9-10

 

 

WDIH? 11-12

 

 

WDIH? 13-14

 

 

WDIH? 15-16

 

 

WDIH? 17-18

 

 

WDIH? 19-20

 

 

WDIH? 21-22

 

WDIH? Bibliography

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March Inspiration

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1. Grids (still)

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2. Pip and Pop’s Confectionary Installations

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3. Paper Nervous Systems by Barbara Wildenboer

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4. Paintings by Lulie Wallace

“Creating consumes. It is all day, every day. It knows neither weekends nor vacations. It is not when we feel like it. It is habit, compulsion, obsession, vocation…Saying “no” has more creative power than ideas, insights and talent combined. No guards time, the thread from which we weave our creations. The math of time is simple: you have less than you think and need more than you know.”

5. Article: “The Most Successful Creative People Constantly Say No” by Kevin Ashton

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6. The story and work of Judith and Joyce Scott

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7. Alejandro Cesarco

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8. MRI Produce Scans

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9. Online Class: Medicine and the Arts

Links: 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9

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New Work: Self-Destruct

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Self-Destruct
Mixed Media (medicine, watercolor, acrylic, ink, oil pastel)
20″ x 28″

Self-Destruct (process 1) Self-Destruct (process 2)

Inspired by this quote from Jill Mormon in response to my question, “What is the hardest part about living with diabetes?”:

“Feeling like my body and the system designed to help me care for it are ALWAYS working against me and my health.”

Self-Destruct (detail 1)

Self-Destruct (detail 2)

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Medicine as Material

 

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During my residency in Chicago, I had several discussions with my advisor Molly Zuckerman-Hartung. She was awesome and gave me so much inspiration and guidance. During one of my individual studio visits with her, I was talking about my obsession with the color pink, especially bubblegum or Pepto Bismol pink and she said, “Why don’t you paint with Pepto Bismol?” She then went on to suggest that I paint with a variety of medicines just to see what happens.

The next day I think, I went to Walgreens and picked up some of the cheapest medicine I could find. I got the Walgreen’s version of Pepto Bismol, aspirin, sugar free cough drops, ibuprofen, cold medicine, glucose tablets, and glucose liquid, plus some extra things like alcohol swabs and socks for diabetics.

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I made a couple pieces with the medicine. My favorite is the first piece that I made. I took a piece of unprimed canvas and pinned it to the wall so that it would lay horizontally with assistance from a chair. I proceeded to squirt, splatter, and drip the pepto, cold medicine, and some liquid watercolor onto the canvas. The liquids sat on the surface of the canvas for days before finally getting absorbed into the fabric and drying. It was pretty interesting to see how it changed each time I went in my studio.

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I also experimented with imprinted surfaces. I put a layer of spackle on two small boards and pushed ibuprofen, cough drops, and some bottle caps into it. I also squirted cold medicine onto the surface as it dried. I ended up painting on top of everything once it was dry.

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Here are a few more pieces where I mixed paint and liquid medicine:

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DSC_2226Thanks for reading!

 

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Experimental Summer

I wish I had the time to write a post reviewing every single day of my residency, because that’s how much content I have to share. Unfortunately my schedule is completely packed, but I at least want to share some images of things I’m working on! Also, if you can’t tell from the photos, I’m experimenting a LOT. A teeny bit of information: I’ve been working with sugar, medicine, and obviously the colors red and pink. Thanks for visiting!

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Mini Medical School Part II

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Mini Medical School is officially over and it was a great experience for me. If you missed the first part of this post, you can read it here. Today I’m going to talk about the last two sessions.

The topic for the third week’s lecture was “The Human Form Through the History of Art,” presented by Hollins University Associate Professor Jennifer Anderson. We mostly looked at different portrayals of the body through the history of art. Jennifer also talked about artists’ consistent interest with the body and depicting it realistically. Beauty was a big part of the talk, and we were reminded to keep in mind that people’s perception of beauty was different hundreds of years ago and it also varies from culture to culture.

The interactive half of the third session for my group was a talk with a practitioner from Virginia Prosthetics. This session surprised me. I have to admit that I was probably the least interested in this session, but I came out of it feeling grateful. As a diabetic, I’ve often thought about neuropathy and the risk of amputation, but for some reason I never thought about the possibility of having a prosthetic leg. The reason I felt grateful for this session is because I learned about the different options and the new technology in prosthetics and it was relieving in a way. Maybe because it seems a lot better than being stuck in a wheelchair without a leg. During the session, I waited for the practitioner to mention diabetes, and eventually he did, saying that most of their patients are diabetics who had a foot injury that wasn’t taken care of. At the end of the session, I asked him what the average age of his diabetic patients is and he said late 50s to 70. That’s not very old.

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A few small sketches of prosthetic leg sockets

Last night was the fourth and last session. The lecture topic was “Body of Evidence: What Happens When Things Go Awry?” and it was presented by VTC’s Associate Professor of Surgery Carol Gilbert. Basically, we learned about a bunch of things that can go wrong with the body. It was a kind of morbid way to end the series. One thing I learned is that giving birth to a healthy baby really is a miracle. Staying relatively healthy through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood is also a miracle for sure.

For the second half of the night, I learned about the school’s use of standardized patients and moulage. Standardized patients are basically regular people who are trained to portray a sick patient so that the medical students have someone to practice on and receive feedback from.

Moulage is defined as the art of creating mock injuries. It’s actually a pretty simple process once you get the hang of it. Here is my injured hand that one of the SD’s did for me:

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How convenient that yesterday was April Fools Day, right??

At the end of the night there was a short reception and we also received certificates of completion. Overall, I was very satisfied with the whole event and I highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in art and/or medicine. The staff said the plan is to make the program an ongoing thing. I will post information on that whenever I get it. Also, some of the sketches and artwork that participants created during this event will be displayed in The Art of Science Exhibition, which I mentioned on my news page. The opening reception is Thursday April 17th from 5:30-7:30pm. Thanks for reading!

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