Tag: insulin

Where Does It Hurt?

My final paper/project for my Writing as Art class last semester… I was going to make some edits before sharing it, but I decided to post it the way it was submitted first. I’m very attached to this work and will continue to develop it over the next few months. Creating this project was both challenging and incredibly rewarding. The thought of sharing it publicly gives me a lot of anxiety, but I am interested to see how others receive it. Please feel free to leave comments! xoxo

Download the PDF version

WDIH? Cover WDIH? 1-2

 

 

 

WDIH 3-4

 

 

WDIH? 5-6

 

 

WDIH? 7-8

 

 

WDIH? 9-10

 

 

WDIH? 11-12

 

 

WDIH? 13-14

 

 

WDIH? 15-16

 

 

WDIH? 17-18

 

 

WDIH? 19-20

 

 

WDIH? 21-22

 

WDIH? Bibliography

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WIP: Yes II

yes II (process 1)

I’m working large again! Last summer I created a large mixed media painting in Chicago and it was kind of a turning point for me so I wanted to try out a similar process. This time around I’m playing with different images/symbols/icons and I’m trying to remain open to text. Here are some photos from the process:

yes II (process 2)

yes II (process 3)

yes II (process 7)

yes II (process 4)

yes II (process 5)

yes II (process 6)

Thanks for visiting! Stay tuned for more progress. xoxo

 

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Pig

Insulin, the precious liquid that keeps me and millions of other diabetics alive, was actually discovered pretty recently. Prior to insulin, when someone developed diabetes, it was fatal. In the 1920s, Frederick Banting and Charles Best were able to extract fluid from the pancreas of slaughtered cows and they learned that it could be used to manage diabetes. Animal insulin, mostly from cows and pigs, was the only treatment for insulin-dependent diabetes until the 1980s, when a synthetic insulin (human insulin) was created. Today, most diabetics use the synthetic insulin, but animal insulin is still available.

I was pretty young when someone told me that my insulin came from pigs. I wasn’t happy about it. I was diagnosed in 1994, well after synthetic insulin was invented, so it’s very possible that I’ve never injected myself with animal insulin. Nonetheless, it’s a theme I began to explore this past summer and I plan to do more work about it in the future.

Life or Death

Life or Death
Ink + Acrylic
9″ x 12″

Mutant

Mutant
Mixed Media
9″ x 12″

Pig Detail

 

 

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Various New Works

As a grad student, one of my goals is to make a lot of work and flesh out a lot of ideas. I got a good start during my first summer residency in Chicago. Here are several of the small paintings and drawings I created:

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)
8″ x 8″
Watercolor

Untitled (Anonymous)

Untitled (Anonymous)
8″ x 8″
Ink + acrylic

Untitled (Pink Grid)

Untitled (Pink Grid)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

Untitled (R/N)

Untitled (R/N)
6″ x 6″
Ink + gouache + tape

Untitled (Other Grid)

Untitled (Data)
6″ x 6″
Blood

Untitled (Conversation)

Untitled (Conversation)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink

Untitled (Deal With It)

Untitled (Deal With It)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink + acrylic

Untitled (Scrambled)

Untitled (Scrambled)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + oil pastel

Untitled (Ketones)
Untitled (Ketones)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

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The Sugar Sickness is Coming for You

DSC_2565_2

During my first residency in Chicago, sugar became an important material for me. In week 2, I was thinking about sugar a lot. I thought about going to birthday parties as a child and not being able to eat the birthday cake. I thought about the countless times people have said to me, “You can’t have sugar, right?” I thought about my struggles with my weight, especially in high school. The nice thing about being in grad school is that I was surrounded by other artists who I could discuss my thoughts with.

DSC_2074

Like I said in my last post, a colleague suggested that I actually use sugar as a material in my artwork. The thought fascinated me and I was eager to try it out. The first thing I did was research sugar skulls. I knew that sugar skulls are pretty sturdy and last a long time when made correctly so I looked for a recipe and then bought the ingredients. I wanted to make insulin vials out of sugar, but first I needed a mold. I bought moldable plastic on amazon and that worked well, but my final mini sculptures weren’t as clean as I wanted them to be and they broke easily. I didn’t make any more of them because of time limitations, but now that I’m home I plan on experimenting to find a better method/sugar mixture.

DSC_2200

DSC_2215

I also tried painting with sugar and I was much more satisfied with these results. I mixed sugar and water on a stove until the consistency was gel-like and then I mixed some with acrylic gel medium and sometimes acrylic paint and I left the rest plain. I applied the sugar mixtures on Yupo paper in a variety of ways:

sugarcollage

Later on, I made more sugar mixtures and applied them onto unstretched canvas in several layers. This one also has food coloring in it.

sugarcanvascollage

My favorite part about this piece was watching the sugar crack and fall off, revealing this crystal texture underneath:

DSC_2523

I also painted a long piece of black canvas with sugar. Here’s part of it:

DSC_2379

I made a few more pieces on Yupo paper and watercolor paper and even added a few drops of blood to the sugar. Get it? Bloodsugar?

DSC_2373

I plan on continuing to experiment with sugar in my work because whether the results are good or not, I really enjoy the process. In my next post, I’ll talk about another non-traditional material that I worked with. Thanks for reading!

DSC_2198

 

 

 

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Getting It Out

Yes Wall

This is my “Yes Wall,” on which I do (almost) anything that I think of. It’s been a weird process, but I’ll have to talk about it later because my schedule today is pretty packed (per usual). I just want to give snippets of info on here so I remember to come back to them once I have time. Thanks for reading and have a nice weekend! xoxo

Yes Wall (detail)

Yes Wall (detail)

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