Tag: body

Experimenting with Methods of Removal

Over the next several months I’m going to be making a lot more of these “cell” paintings that you may have been seeing and one thing I’ve been really interested in is methods of removal. Physically removing or covering these cellular shapes comments on both mortality and the nature of medical studies. I initially got the idea from artist Ross Bleckner, who has been a big influence on my work over the past year. He would paint flowers and then scrape them away to illustrate their short life span.

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Early last week I completed my first official experiment using watercolor on Yupo paper. I began with a grid (of course) and wrote down a brief description of how I planned to remove or otherwise obscure the painted circle. I then painted the circles and proceeded from there.

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Below are detail photos of some of my favorite results:

Removal Chart

Thanks for reading and looking. Please share if you like what you see! xoxo

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Fall 2015: Work

The past semester was a bit overwhelming–hence the lack of activity on here–but I’m so excited about the work I’m making. Here are some photos of the things I’ve been working on for the past few months. Next up: thesis!

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August/September/October Inspiration

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1. Surgical Wall Project | Joshua Klein, Roy Schneider, and Tonya Floyd-Bradstock

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2. Lynda Boss Illustrations

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3. Andreina Davila | [I AM] Series

4. Art Experiments in Space

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5. Scarred for Life | Ted Meyer

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6. El Deafo by Cece Bell

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7. One Lump or Two? Things That Suck About Being Diabetic by Haidee Soule Merritt

1/2/3/4/5/6/7

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Where Does It Hurt?

My final paper/project for my Writing as Art class last semester… I was going to make some edits before sharing it, but I decided to post it the way it was submitted first. I’m very attached to this work and will continue to develop it over the next few months. Creating this project was both challenging and incredibly rewarding. The thought of sharing it publicly gives me a lot of anxiety, but I am interested to see how others receive it. Please feel free to leave comments! xoxo

Download the PDF version

WDIH? Cover WDIH? 1-2

 

 

 

WDIH 3-4

 

 

WDIH? 5-6

 

 

WDIH? 7-8

 

 

WDIH? 9-10

 

 

WDIH? 11-12

 

 

WDIH? 13-14

 

 

WDIH? 15-16

 

 

WDIH? 17-18

 

 

WDIH? 19-20

 

 

WDIH? 21-22

 

WDIH? Bibliography

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November + December Inspiration

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1. John Baldessari’s work and especially his philosophy on art: “I get really attracted to details and parts of things. I used to tell people I would feel happy if there was just one square inch of a painting I liked. I wouldn’t even have to like the whole painting.”

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2. Anatomy of Digestion cup and saucer from Street Anatomy

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3. Alexa Minc | Jewelry inspired by the human body

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4. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer | The Pulse Room

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5. Mayan Art

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6. Boo and Boo Factory | Handmade Leather Jewelry

“You are about to enter the much more difficult phase of unlearning everything you have learned in college, of questioning it, redefining it, challenging it, and reinventing it to call it your own. More than in any other vocation, being an artist means always starting from nothing. Our work as artists is courageous and scary. There is no brief that comes along with it, no problem solving that’s given as a task… An artist’s work is almost entirely inquiry based and self-regulated. It is a fragile process of teaching oneself to work alone, and focusing on how to hone your quirky creative obsessions so that they eventually become so oddly specific that they can only be your own.”

7. Teresita Fernández’s 2013 commencement address at VCU 

Links: 1/2/3/4/5/6/7

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Everything Else from Summer

I don’t mean to imply that the following pieces are unimportant compared to the pieces that I’ve already shared on here. I tried to somewhat categorize the body of work I created in Chicago (sugar, medicine, small, etc.) and these are the pieces that didn’t really fit into those categories. Enjoy!

Untitled (Organs)

Untitled (Organs)
Mixed Media
18″ x 24″

Bodily

Bodily
Mixed Media
11″ x 14″

I also wanted to include some of the pieces that aren’t done yet.

Untitled (Finger)

Untitled (Finger)
Ink + Watercolor
9″ x 12″

Untitled (Bars)

Untitled (Bars)
Acrylic
9″ x 12″

Untitled (Help Wanted)

Untitled (Help Wanted)
Spackle
11″ x 14″

Don't Give Her Cake

Don’t Give Her Cake
Mixed Media
11″ x 14″

Untitled (Cross)

Untitled (Cross)
Mixed Media
11″ x 14″

Untitled (Bubbles)

Untitled (Bubbles)
Ink
9″ x 12″

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More Summer Pieces

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Tender
9″ x 12″
Ink + Oil pastel on brown craft paper

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Untitled (Shape)
11″ x 14″
Watercolor + Gouache on watercolor paper

Subtle Cry

Subtle Cry
9″ x 12″
Acrylic + Oil stick on brown craft paper

Nope

Nope
11″ x 14″
Watercolor + Oil stick + Oil pastel on watercolor paper

Community

Community
9″ x 12″
Ink on brown craft paper

Untitled (Scrambled 2)

Untitled (Scrambled 2)
11″ x 14″
Acrylic on canvas paper

(Untitled) Shape 2

Untitled (Shape 2)
11″ x 14″
Acrylic + Oil pastel on canvas paper

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Various New Works

As a grad student, one of my goals is to make a lot of work and flesh out a lot of ideas. I got a good start during my first summer residency in Chicago. Here are several of the small paintings and drawings I created:

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)

Untitled (Red and Blue Grid)
8″ x 8″
Watercolor

Untitled (Anonymous)

Untitled (Anonymous)
8″ x 8″
Ink + acrylic

Untitled (Pink Grid)

Untitled (Pink Grid)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

Untitled (R/N)

Untitled (R/N)
6″ x 6″
Ink + gouache + tape

Untitled (Other Grid)

Untitled (Data)
6″ x 6″
Blood

Untitled (Conversation)

Untitled (Conversation)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink

Untitled (Deal With It)

Untitled (Deal With It)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + ink + acrylic

Untitled (Scrambled)

Untitled (Scrambled)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor + oil pastel

Untitled (Ketones)
Untitled (Ketones)
6″ x 6″
Watercolor

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New Work: Self-Destruct

Self-Destruct

Self-Destruct
Mixed Media (medicine, watercolor, acrylic, ink, oil pastel)
20″ x 28″

Self-Destruct (process 1) Self-Destruct (process 2)

Inspired by this quote from Jill Mormon in response to my question, “What is the hardest part about living with diabetes?”:

“Feeling like my body and the system designed to help me care for it are ALWAYS working against me and my health.”

Self-Destruct (detail 1)

Self-Destruct (detail 2)

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Yes.

While I was in Chicago, I was a little overwhelmed by the amount of feedback I received and consequently the number of ideas I had for my work. I wasn’t sure which path to go down and which method best suited my goals. This is how I was feeling when I had a studio visit with Gregg Bordowitz, the program director. I discussed my struggles with him, as well as my goals. He gave me tons of great advice, including one piece that became a major turning point for me.

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About a week or two earlier, I had gone to a fabric shop and picked up this piece of bright red-orange polyester material from a clearance bin. I wasn’t sure what I would do with it, I was just drawn to the color. I hung it up in my studio like this for a while and didn’t touch it. During my meeting with Gregg, we looked at the material as we discussed creating a “yes” wall. His instructions were as follows: 1) For 3 or 4 days, say “yes” to everything. 2) The next day, say “no.” Cover things up and make conscious decisions about what you want to include. I was really excited to try it out and decided to use the red-orange material since it was already something I’ve never used before.

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I had a lot of fun at first. I drew a large figure without worrying about proportions. I didn’t plan, I just painted. The fabric absorbed the paint quickly so I had to change the way I usually paint. The process was quick and pretty crude. I was happy with the piece so far and didn’t really want to add anything else, but it was my “yes” wall, so I forced myself to do more.

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I added more things and started to like it less and feel stuck. I started becoming concerned with the composition and I thought that I had already put too many colors so I stepped away from it for a few days and worked on other things. I guess at this point I wasn’t following the directions anymore.

When I did come back to it, I was in the zone. I used different materials and added text, numbers, shapes, images, and texture. By the time I “finished”, it had become my favorite piece from the whole summer. I’m really proud of it.

Yes.

Here is a list of the materials I used: acrylic paint (liquid, heavy bodied, and soft bodied), ink, oil pastel, oil stick, clear plastic, liquid watercolor, diabetic socks, medical tape, and thumbtacks.

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I’m not sure what’s going to happen with this piece. Right now it’s folded up in a bag until I find somewhere to hang it up. I might add more to it, but it’s more likely that I’ll make a new one using a similar process.

Thanks for reading!

 

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